Tharos News

Tharos EquiNectar
Calcium - how much does your horse need?

Calcium - how much does your horse need?

Calcium is the most abundant mineral present in the equine body with 99% found in bones and teeth, with bone composition being 35% calcium. A horse’s skeleton acts as both a structural support for the body and a readily available source of stored calcium for any times the intake of calcium does not meet requirements. Calcium also plays an important role in muscle contraction, so a balanced diet supplying calcium is essential for competition horses. Calcium is regulated with another important mineral, phosphorus and the sunshine vitamin D to achieve a fine balance in the bones, where relatively large amounts...

Read more →


Tharos EquiNectar
My horse is bloated, what can I do?

My horse is bloated, what can I do?

"My horse is bloated, what can I do?" This is perhaps one of the most common questions we hear from horse owners.  As a responsible horse owner, you recognise that tummy bloating is causing discomfort. Perhaps your horse is very sensitive in the girth area. You've realised that this is connected to what your horse is eating and how they are responding to their feed.  One owner, Zoe, had been worrying about her mare Celyn, a six year old cob. Celyn looked very swollen and was obviously in discomfort. Another customer of ours - Joanna - kindly recommended that Zoe try EquiNectar....

Read more →


Tharos EquiNectar
EquiNectar for Performance

EquiNectar for Performance

We've just launched a new website focused towards the use of EquiNectar for horses involved in performance sports, like horseracing.  EquiNectar - Improving digestive perfomance for horses in training

Read more →


Tharos EquiNectar
Why complete digestion of starch is VITAL for your horse

Why complete digestion of starch is VITAL for your horse

Carbohydrates digested by enzymes and absorbed in the small intestine yield more energy than carbohydrates digested by microbial action, so if more of the carbohydrates in a diet can be broken down by enzymes, rather than microbial fermentation in the cecum, the horse can effectively utilise more of the plant’s energy.

Read more →