Tharos News

Harry Paul
Hindgut acidosis in horses

Why is hindgut acidosis dangerous in horses?

Hind-gut Acidosis can be acute (sudden) or chronic (long-standing). An example of acute hind-gut acidosis would be the pony who breaks out of his stable and gets into the feed room. He gorges feed, and the result is a massive overflow of starch into the hind-gut. There is a sudden reduction in the pH of the hind-gut, and the healthy bacteria in the gut get very stressed at the change in pH, and begin to die. As they die they release toxins which are absorbed into the blood of the pony. These toxins result in an inflammatory response by the body which can...

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Harry Paul
What conditions could be linked to my horse's hindgut

What conditions could be linked to my horse's hindgut?

Until recently, many possible issues with the hind-gut of the horse have not been recognised. Horse owners and vets alike have overlooked the significance of this enormous organ, which can hold 150L of feed material and is responsible for 30% of the horses’ weight.  However, we are now becoming more aware of its complexity, and beginning to develop an understanding of its possible influence on many aspects of health and disease including: The comfort, happiness and well being of a horse Issues within the hind-gut which could cause failure to thrive Connections between the hind-gut and the skin/ coat Influence...

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Harry Paul
Horse Microbiome

The Microbiome - what is it and why is it important for horses?

The collection of bacteria, protozoa, viruses and fungi in an animal's gut is known as the microbiome.  It is very complex with over 500 species and strains of bacteria alone, and a total of over a trillion organisms. In humans there are 10 bacterial cells for every human cell. This applies to horses too, where research into the microbiome is showing that it plays a very important part in the overall health of the animal.

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Harry Paul
What is the problem with how we feed our horses today

What is the problem with how we feed our horses today?

Horses were designed to eat grass! Horses normally eat pasture constantly. As such their digestive systems are designed to constantly receive the chewed pasture and digest it.

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